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Archive for the ‘Sculpture’ Category

Monthly Theme: Nature
Weekly Content: Art in Central Park
Daily Subject: Sculpture

For Baby…

So, this was a hard choice. There are a lot of statues to choose from in Central Park. The Alice in Wonderland statue would seem to be an obvious choice, but I think it would be more interesting to an older child who knows the characters. There’s also Balto, a statue of a famous Alaskan dog, but NYC babies see a lot of “woof woofs” around the city on a daily basis. Most NYC babies (well, at least the NYC babies I know) don’t get to see horses on a daily basis. My little guy tries to “neigh” but the only horse he really knows is that blue one in Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What do You See? If you take baby to see this statue of Simon Bolivar (which is located on Central Park South) you will also probably run into some real horses lining up for the carriage rides through the park.

For Mommy…

The placement of this monument at the start of 6th Avenue is no coincidence. In 1945, Mayor LaGuardia renamed 6th Avenue, Avenue of the Americas, in an attempt to recognize the unity of North, South and Central America. Bolivar, an important figure in Latin America’s independence from Spain, is also a symbol of unity among the countries of the Americas. The streets of NYC are bursting with history. Speaking from personal experience, I feel that many people must walk past this monument without realizing its historical significance. It’s almost like the old tree falling in the woods. If you’re not listening for it, does it make a sound?

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Monthly Theme: Nature
Weekly Content: Art in Central Park
Daily Subject: Sculpture

For Baby…

Your little one will enjoy looking up at this obelisk. It’s more than 70 feet tall! Of course, NYC babies are used to looking up at tall buildings, but for some reason, tucked away between the trees, the Obelisk has special appeal. Whether you have a chance to take baby to see the Obelisk (it’s located behind The Met at 81st Street) or if you just take a peek at this picture, you both can talk about how it goes up into the sky. My little one has been using the word “up” for a while now but has just started clearly articulating the ending /p/ sound. It’s interesting because he’s been using words with the beginning /p/ sound for a while, but he now also articulates it for the ending and middle sound (ex. apple) of words.

For Mommy…

Not only is it amazing to see a piece of artwork more than 3000 years old standing in Central Park, it’s amazing to think of how this huge structure got all the way to NYC from Egypt in the late 1800s. According to the Central Park website, it took 19 days just to cross it over the 86th Street transverse! Click on the above link for a quick history of the Obelisk.

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Monthly Theme: Nature
Weekly Content: Art in Central Park
Daily Subject: Sculpture

For Baby…

Lately, my little guy loves to stop and listen to the sounds of nature. He’ll pause to hear the rustle of the trees or the sound of birds singing. Most babies love to hear the sound of water. My son really enjoys holding his hand under the faucet of the tub while listening to the echo of the water rushing out. Obviously, it only makes sense to listen to the sound of a water fountain if you are actually present at the fountain. The Bethesda Fountain is located off the 72nd Street Transverse toward the middle of Central Park. If you don’t have a chance to make it over to the park, take a look at this picture with baby and talk about how the water is pouring down. Next time you and baby are washing hands, remember to pause and listen to the sound of the water pouring down.

For Mommy…

The Bethesda Fountain is a great place to “people watch” on a crisp autumn day. Not only can you take in the beauty of the nature surrounding you in every direction, you’re most likely to catch some other interesting action in the general vicinity. The magnificence of this area reminds us of the importance of preserving public spaces. I’m interested in checking out Ken Burns new film, The National Parks: America’s Best Idea, devoted to the history of national parks in our country. Of course, Central Park is not a national park, however, one can appreciate this idea of preserving the natural beauty of our country (and city) when taking a stroll through Bethesda Terrace.

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Monthly Theme: Nature

Weekly Content: Art in Central Park

Daily Subject: Sculpture

This week, we’re going to shift from looking at nature depicted in art to focusing on art displayed in nature. We New Yorkers are so lucky to have such a beautiful park in the center of our city. Central Park is a peaceful oasis that balances the hectic pace of life here in NYC. There is so much to appreciate about a stroll through the park. This week will highlight a few of the works of art that are on display amid the natural beauty of this historical park.

For Baby…

Just looking at a picture of this sculpture is interesting to baby.  Can you imagine how much fun it would be to climb up next to this statue of Hans Christian Anderson? My little guy is really into imitating the sounds of animals. When looking at this statue, we’ll probably be doing a lot of “quack quack”ing. I think he’ll also be interested in the big book and hat as well. What a great pic this would make of baby looking up at the huge Hans. There’s nothing better than art you can climb!


Hans Christian Andersen

"Hans Christian Andersen." Getty Images. Getty Images, Inc., 1999-2008. Answers.com 28 Sep. 2009. http://www.answers.com/topic/hans-christian-andersen-large-image

For Mommy…

Hans Christian Andersen (Danish, 1805-1875) is the author of many of the fairy tales we grew up watching as kids – “The Ugly Duckling,” “Thumbelina,” and, my favorite, “The Little Mermaid,” just to name a few. How important is it, as our kids grow up and fall in love with these stories, to share the origin of these beautiful tales? This statue by George Lober is a reminder to appreciate the history of children’s literature.

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Monthly Theme: Mother and Child

Weekly Content: African American Art

Daily Subject: Sculpture

Elizabeth Catlett (see Tuesday’s post) found her true passion in sculpture.  In her 2003 interview with Sculpture Magazine she is quoted as saying her interest lies in “using forms to express some kind of feeling.” The next work of art does just that.

Elizabeth Catlett "Standing Mother and Child," 1978, Bronze sculpture with bronze patina, 16 1/2 H x 4 1/4 W x 3 1/2 D inches/Copyright Elizabeth Catlett/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. http://www.granthill.com/ghc/

For Baby…

Isn’t it just the best feeling to snuggle up with your baby? As wiggly and active as babies can be, we can all appreciate those precious cozy moments.  Cuddling with your little one helps your baby feel safe and secure.  Show baby this sculpture and talk about how much you love holding him or her in your arms.

For Mommy…

The mother in this sculpture seems to be soaking up the incredible feeling of snuggling with her baby. She has this look of pure bliss on her face. I’m in awe of Catlett’s ability to convey such intense emotion through sculpture. The mother and baby seem as though they are a unified form. Isn’t that the meaning of a true bond, that we give a part of ourselves to our children and that a part of our children becomes a part of who we are?

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